"Only the educated are free."
by:
Epictetus
(ca 55-135 A.D.) Greek philospher
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WRONG
 -- Anonymous     
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    Nonsense
     -- Cosmo, Free State     
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    If education is understood as the applied understanding of ones' environment for self development, this is a brilliant quote.
     -- Self-Determined, Detroit     
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     -- Anonymous      
    i think it makes sense alot.. i did a whole frickin essay on the dahm topic homie yo that was intense!
     -- Bionca, Ghetto City     
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    Depending on how you define the context, this could be a 5 star plus or a thumbs down.
     -- Mike, Norwalk     
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    Perhaps if we take it to mean that "Only people who understand the concept of freedom can be free" then it makes more sense. Or as Ted Nugent put it "I never went to college, I was too busy learning things."
     -- J Carlton, Calgary     
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    Very little correlation. Both education and freedom are relative terms
     -- Jack, Green, OH     
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    It was metaphorically speeking guys
     -- RobertSRQ     
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    Education and miseducation. What was Marx thinking when he made free education in public schools one of his ten planks? I have 2 daughters with degrees. To have a degree is to have proof you were fooled more than those with no degree.
     -- Dave Wilber, St. Louis MO     
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    Knowlege is power -- those without knowlege will not have the power to be free.
     -- E Archer, NYC     
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    This quote means nothing in today's application, except for an ideological feelgood placebo. Freedom and liberty are as inalienable to men regardless of ignorance or education. The grease monkey is as free as the Harvard Professor. This statement, in retrospect, is in reference to the Greek polis in which the individual was merely a conglomerate of the whole. The word "educated" in this quote is a mistranslation of what should be "knowledgeable". “Knowing” or “knowledge” of something, by their definition, meant an automatic action of doing what was “good”. “Evil” was nearly synonymous with “ignorance”. The Greeks looked at crime as a mere expression of ignorance. If you were ignorant and could not control your actions within the polis, then you had to be refrained and taught until you became knowledgeable—or “good”. The Greek’s definition of “freedom” constituted the physical ability of manifesting “good” actions. As such, it would logically follow that only the “knowledgeable” who by very nature have “good” actions can be given the “freedom” by the polis to physically manifest their goodness. The ignorant—or “evil”—were not given the ability by the polis to manifest their ignorance—in other words, they were not “free”.
     -- Logan, Memphis, TN     
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    Sounds like Greek to me Logan but it still sounds quite plausible. It helps make sense out of an otherwise confused sounding quote.
     -- warren, olathe     
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     -- DENNIS KOLB, WARRENTON      
    Thanks Logan, a time sensitive observation making clear what was said then.
     -- Mike, Norwalk     
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    Thank you Logan for the doctrine. Epictetus is one of the sharpest razors in the box ! Considering his life and timing in Rome is well noted. Knowledge of Liberty and Freedom, Mind and body, extremely powerful. Excellent reading concerning the understanding of Prohairesis through rigorous self-discipline. knowing that which good is, is profitable to all.
    " Conduct me, Zeus, and thou O Destiny
    Wherever thy decree has fixed my lot.
    I follow willingly, and, did I not,
    Wicked and wretched would I follow still."

    " Whoever yields Properly to fate
    Is deemed, wise among men,
    and knows the laws of heaven."

    " O Crito, if it thus please the gods, thus let it be."

    " Anytus and Meletus may indeed kill me, but,
    They cannot harm me."

    Epictetus was a born slave. and as the apostle Paul stated
    " Godliness with contentment is of great gain." If thou would be free, choose it rather. O wretched man that I am, I will seek after that which good is all the days of my life.
     -- Ronw13, Oregon     
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    Thumbs up, Logan! If I remember correctly, you are a college professor ... it would have been good to have had you as a teacher.
     -- E Archer, NYC     
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